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How to access a 2nd router on different subnet connected to main tomato router

Discussion in 'Tomato Firmware' started by meazz1, Jun 30, 2010.

  1. meazz1

    meazz1 Addicted to LI Member

    I have a 2nd router/accress point connected to my asus rt -n16 router.
    The Asus router is running TB 2.6 tomato mode. This router is also connected
    to the cable modem. I can access asus web gui from a pc connected to the 2nd router, but
    not able to connect to the web gui of the 2nd router from a pc connected to the asus router.

    How can I access the 2nd router from a pc connected to the asus router?

    Asus ip is 192.168.2.1. - connected to WAN
    d router 192.168.0.1 - connected to asus LAN port.
     
  2. RonWessels

    RonWessels Network Guru Member

    What are you trying to do with this setup?

    It's not surprising that you can't talk to your second router, since any client on the 192.168.2.1 network will send packets addressed to 192.168.0.X out the WAN port of the Asus router.

    If you are trying to create an isolated sub-network, you should have the WAN port of the D router connected to a LAN port of the Asus router. Configure the D router to have a WAN address in the 192.168.2.X network, perhaps 192.168.2.2. Set the gateway and DNS server to 192.168.2.1. Set the LAN address to 192.168.0.1 and enable its DHCP server. Enable remote administration on the D router.

    Now, from a PC connected to the Asus router, open a web browser to 192.168.2.2 and you should get the web gui of the D router.

    For this setup, anything attached on the LAN side of your D router is able to connect to anything attached to the Asus router, but not vice versa. And everyone is able to get to the Internet.
     
  3. Yruasack

    Yruasack Networkin' Nut Member

    You can access the D router and it's clients (if needed) if you set up the static routes to do it on your Asus router.

    Destination IP Address: 192.168.0.0
    Gateway IP Address: 192.168.2.2 (using RonWessels IP Addressing above)
    Subnet: 255.255.255.0 (assuming that's what you're using)
     
  4. Dagger

    Dagger Networkin' Nut Member

    Assuming the D router is connected to the Asus network (192.168.2.0/24) via the WAN port.... then the D router should have an interface in the 192.168.2.0 network just like any other client in the Asus network. If so, you would access the D router from the Asus network just the same as you would access the Asus router from the internet. You would have to enable remote access on the D router and address it from the Asus network using the WAN IP of the D router. Because the WAN IP of the D router is in the Asus network, you do not need any static routes on the Asus router because you never leave Layer 2.

    Now if you want to access the D router from the internet... you would have to enable remote access on the D router and forward the appropriate port from the Asus router to the WAN IP of the D router.

    I've done this several years ago using a couple of stock Linksys routers...
     
  5. Yruasack

    Yruasack Networkin' Nut Member

    I should have clarified. You won't need static routes if all you're doing is trying to set up your system so you can access your D router from the Asus network (192.168.2.0). You would just need to follow what RonWessels suggested. What I was addressing was the statement about not being able to access anything on the D (192.168.0.0) network from the Asus (192.168.2.0) network. For that you would need to set up a static route on the Asus to point to the 192.168.0.0 network. If you never plan on or want systems attached to your Asus (192.168.2.0) network to access systems/files on your D (192.168.0.0) network then you don't need to worry about the static route. Systems on your D (192.168.0.0) network will, however, be able to access systems/files on your Asus(192.168.2.0) network at any time.
     

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