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Linksys e900 going bad after 6 weeks?

Discussion in 'Cisco/Linksys Wireless Routers' started by fefrie, Oct 8, 2013.

  1. fefrie

    fefrie Serious Server Member

    Let me preface this first with the fact that I had a tplink wr-1043nd that ran well for about three years before it started to require powercycles many times a day. Before that I had a Buffalo whr-54g which still runs absolutely fine. So i'm moderately good at the tech stuff.

    I flashed ddwrt onto my linksys e900, and it worked mostly fine for about six weeks. Then one day, something happened to the ports or the wireless, so I suspected a corrupted firmware or ram.

    I have a house with 7 people and various computers, and after doing some research that tomato is better than ddwrt at qos (it really is), so I flashed tomato onto the router. Everything was great for about a week.

    Then one night, while on my desktop that is wired to the router, my computer would connect and disconnect from the port. Wireless went dead too. The router would brick itself and after a couple of hours I could get back in to reflash with tomato. Worked for about an hour.

    I finally gave up and flashed back to the updated stock firmware.

    I've since bought another of the same model (I know stupid), but I bought it with a 3 year replacement warranty so when it does go bad, I can return it to the place I bought it from instead of mailing it back to whatever service depot losing more money on shipping.

    My question is, (a little redundant) is Do these things go bad? It ran for a couple of weeks fine with ddwrt, that went bad, then for about a week with tomato.

    This router is rated at it's bottom class which means small house and less than three users, but people have been using WRT54G's in commercial settings with I would assume be more demanding. wrt54gs are YEARS old and still hold up fine.

    Why does linksys rate this router as so wimpy? It's specs should be just fine to share a 10mbit connection, and since no one streams from one device to another, all the dual band and gigabit ports don't matter.

    Are routers these days that fragile? Are the electronics that prone to failure these days? This router on amazon has 70+positives but 30ish one star ratings. Does that indicate a high failure rate?

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