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Max rate question (wireless)

Discussion in 'Tomato Firmware' started by Washu-Chan, Jun 22, 2012.

  1. Washu-Chan

    Washu-Chan Networkin' Nut Member

    I was wondering if it's normal for the maximum wireless speed rate to be reduced by half when the wireless radio is not in use?

    For example, I've installed the K2.4 build of the Shibby firmware (tomato-ND-1.28.5x-093-VPN.trx) on my Linksys WRT300N V1, and I was able to measure (and maintain) 270 Mbps according to inSSIDer. However, when I installed the K2.6 build (tomato-K26-1.28.RT-MIPSR1-093-MiniIPv6.trx) on the same router, it started as 270 Mbps max, but later on, it was reduced by half (135 MBps).

    The same occurrence happened when I installed the latest K2.6 build (tomato-K26USB-1.28.RT-MIPSR2-093-VPN.trx) on my WRT610N V2 router, with the difference being that the max speed is reduced to 150 MBps, instead of the proper 300 MBps.

    I did the proper reset (i.e., full NVRAM erase) when I install new firmware.
     
  2. koitsu

    koitsu Network Guru Member

    I imagine this is normal, as long as the rate increases when I/O begins. The reason has to do with power saving; most every IC these days has some form of it; wireless chipsets, Ethernet switches, CPUs, GPUs, mice, keyboards, hard disks, and even (much to some folks' surprise) southbridges. Do not confuse these features with things like ACPI or (the long deprecated) APM. Each device/chip has its own capability, and there is no standard. Furthermore, Broadcom ICs (for wifi, CPU, etc.) tend to be closed-source so being able to toggle these features is entirely up to the vendor.
     
  3. Washu-Chan

    Washu-Chan Networkin' Nut Member

    I'm wondering if the power-saving feature is kernel-related?

    I'm guessing that the K2.6 builds has some form of power-saving feature, while the K2.4 builds don't.
     
  4. koitsu

    koitsu Network Guru Member

    It's probably wifi chipset-related, not kernel-related. The binary blob drivers for wifi for Linux 2.6 kernels, provided by Broadcom, probably has other features that the blob for 2.4 do not have.
     
  5. Washu-Chan

    Washu-Chan Networkin' Nut Member

    Which would make sense, since the K2.6 builds have newer drivers installed.
     

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