1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

NAS200 Archive Strategy...

Discussion in 'Cisco/Linksys Network Storage Devices' started by rmcinnes, Apr 30, 2010.

  1. rmcinnes

    rmcinnes Addicted to LI Member

    I have implemented an off-site backup storage strategy for use with my NAS200 in RAID 1 configuration which I felt important to share with other users...

    Purchase a third hard drive, of the same size, and preferably of the same manufacturer and model. I am using 500GB Seagate ST3500320NS drives.

    The procedure is very simple, follow these steps...

    a) shut down [press the power button briefly], and allow NAS200 to shut down.
    b) disconnect power cable, and remove the lower drive.
    c) install the new drive [refer User Manual Chapter 2.3],
    d) reconnect the power cable, and restart NAS200 [press the power button briefly].
    When the restart is complete, NAS200 will double beep as normal, and the Hard Drive lights will flash alternately as the new Drive 2 hard drive is rebuilt.
    e) you can monitor the new drive mirroring process using Administration, Status page of the NAS200 webpage, as the drive RAID 1 is rebuilt...

    While the new drive is rebuild is in progress...
    f) label [date, status, statistics] and package the old lower drive, ready for storage Off-Site.

    The rebuild may take a few hours [maybe all night], but be aware you can continue to access data from Drive 1 while the mirroring is in progress...

    g) Rotate the three drives...
    In an appropriate timeframe [say six months], remove Drive1, and replace it with the previously archived Drive 2.

    Note: I have labelled my hard drives as follows...
    Harddrive Archive01 (NAS200),
    500 GB Hard Drive, Original Disk 02, Raid 1… 

    77.2 GB of Data, 388.1 GB free, 465.3 GB Total.

    New Disk 02 rebuilt to RAID 1 on 30 April 2010…

    Robert
     
  2. jac_goudsmit

    jac_goudsmit Super Moderator Staff Member Member

    This is not a good (general) backup strategy. The most common problem that causes you to lose data is user error. If you accidentally delete a file from a RAID configuration, it will be gone from both drives and you won't be able to restore it unless you have it on your offline disk.

    Of course, it depends totally on how you use your NAS. For example if you use it to store images of your DVD's, it should always be possible to reconstruct any files as long as you have the original DVD's. Also, a RAID-1 configuration makes sense if you want to make sure the data is always accessible even when one disk breaks down. But using the RAID as a backup device in itself doesn't seem like a good strategy to me.

    I have a large number of files on my NAS that are irreplaceable or difficult to replace. They are about 100GB of documents, programs and (mostly) multimedia that I have gathered since 1985 when I got my first PC (actually, when my dad got a PC from his work :biggrin:). While I hardly ever make any changes this collection, it's very important that it will not get lost, even if my NAS gets lost or breaks down, or if something happens to a disk in the NAS. If that would ever happen, it doesn't matter that it would take hours or even days to restore it, but I need to be sure that the data is safe. That's why I make off-site backups to the Internet using Jungle Disk Server Edition, running on my NAS.

    The storage space on Jungle Disk costs money (I use Jungle Disk's Rackspace service so I only pay for the storage space on a monthly basis; if you use Amazon S3 you also need to pay for bandwidth to upload/download) and the initial backup took over a week because of my uplink speed but now I'm confident that my files are safe and in case ANYTHING happens (not just whenever my disk decides to give the ghost). And I don't have to remember to make backups, and I don't have to change media...

    ===Jac
     

Share This Page