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Network Speed Testing

Discussion in 'Tomato Firmware' started by wjtaylor, Sep 23, 2011.

  1. wjtaylor

    wjtaylor Networkin' Nut Member

    Is there a good speed test that presents my minimum speed during a test? Maybe a script?

    Also, when performing these speed tests I see that my speed gradually builds. What would my "minimum" speed be in this sort of situation?

    One last question... Do the QOS rules work on network traffic across the LAN (i.e. two wireless LAN clients between each other)? I move a lot of Samba traffic and am trying to find a way for it to have priority, yet leave bandwidth for www.

    Thanks,
    WT
     
  2. ntest7

    ntest7 Network Guru Member

    Minimum speed is the slowest speed likely to be seen over a long period, such as over a week. It's not unusual for "consumer" connections to slow down during peak access times when all the neighbors are surfing. Business class connections are (very generally speaking) less prone to this.

    To find your minimum, test throughput several times with a reliable test site over a period of time and find what seems to be *your* minimum. A reasonable rule of thumb is 2/3 of your normal throughput.

    Finding a reliable test site is trickier, and depends on where you are located and your ISP. Look for a site that gives you pretty consistent results for tests run fairly close together. I like speedtest.net, but that's no guarantee it will work well for you.

    Don't worry too much about the crests and troughs during the course of a 10~20 second test. The average during that time is what you're looking for.

    No. QOS is for LAN <-> WAN traffic only. But unless you have a really honkin' internet connection you likely don't need to worry about it.

    It's possible to create LAN QOS rules by separating the LAN ports into individual VLANS, and then adding rules between the ports. But that's a lot of trouble (can't use the GUI) and not something that's widely useful.
     

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