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Reliability of ADSL modems

Discussion in 'Tomato Firmware' started by Toastman, Jan 29, 2010.

  1. Toastman

    Toastman Super Moderator Staff Member Member

  2. szfong

    szfong Network Guru Member

    Good ADSL Modems..

    Most ISPs do not over manufacture their residential modems. Although they can connect at adsl2+ speeds, they are not designed to sustain these speeds for long periods. They have cpu, interupts (lousy nic switch chips), and ram limitations. Those freeby modems are not designed for enthusiasts like those on the linksys forums. Even bridge-mode, which removes many ram limitations of freeby modems, the wan/modem will still freeze sometimes, if you open too many connections, epecially since the half-open connection limitations are no longer in effect on newer windows. In the US, the Netopia 3347 used by most at&t and it's companies, are very well regarded by business account users, they cost slightly more than the residential modems, and can be had for less than $50 used. If you need to open alot of outbound/inbound connections, you can put it into bridge mode and use an embedded/pc x86 router distro behind it for PPPoE/DHCP, it'll be very reliable and scale up or down the amount of cpu, ram, nic, based on your need for QoS/shaping, IDS, etc features.... For such high performance routers, as long as you use expensive intel based multi-port nic's, you'll be fine. Even some large companies are using such routers. Tomato routers tend to run on hardware that gobbles up cpu cycles fairly quickly once you reach 50% utilization or so, the cpu usage skyrockets abruptly from their onward (traffic becomes saw tooth shaped) even if the speed only increases by a small percentage.. I noticed DD-WRT using the newer linux kernel can smooth the traffic better than Tomato when cpu usage is near/over capacity, but sacrifices a bit of performance in doing so.

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