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Router or Access Point, which will work here?

Discussion in 'Cisco/Linksys Wireless Routers' started by AndrewB, Jun 8, 2004.

  1. AndrewB

    AndrewB Guest

    I am looking to set up some wireless connectivity at work. We are on a corporate network and now I want to connect three tabletPCs to the network. I need my connection point to pass the corporate given IP addresses to the tablets (using the corporate DHCP servers).
    Is there some way to get the WRT54G to do this or do I need to get the WAP54G?
    New to this wireless stuff. I hope this hasn't been asked too many times. I tried to find the answer through searching, but maybe I am using the wrong terms... :?:
     
  2. elzbal

    elzbal Network Guru Member

    This should not be a big deal. Disable the router's on-board DHCP server. You probably need to connect the corporate LAN to one of the switched ports rather than the "WAN" port.
     
  3. jollymahesh

    jollymahesh Network Guru Member

    WRT54G or a wap54g

    if u have a corporate dhcp server i prefer to have a wap54g wld be the best option
    however if u have a existing WRT54G disable the dhcp table on it and use it as well :D
     
  4. jollymahesh

    jollymahesh Network Guru Member

    WRT54G or a wap54g

    if u have a corporate dhcp server i prefer to have a wap54g wld be the best option
    however if u have a existing WRT54G disable the dhcp table on it and use it as well :D
     
  5. 4Access

    4Access Network Guru Member

    Re: WRT54G or a wap54g

    Why do you prefer the WAP? The WRT is almost the same price, can do everything the WAP can and is WAY more flexible/powerful thanks to all the custom firmware options.

    BTW elzbal is right. Any wireless router can function as an AP by simply disabling the built-in DHCP server and then running a cable from the corporate network to a LAN port on the router..
     
  6. mmkalb

    mmkalb Guest

    same problem, i think

    i have a 2wire (modem & router) home portal and 2 pc conencted: 1 to ethernet port and one to USB port.
    Then, a friend gave me a WRT54G, so, i conected the ethernet cable from the 2wire to the internet port of the wrt, and i got internet in the 2 PC wired to the router, but there is no local network identificated. so i bridge the 2wire to use it just like a modem, and change the mode of my wrt to login to the internet conection from it. but there is no local network.
    I agregate a laptop with wireless conection, this access to internet, but can´t see the other pc´s.
    Please, somebody help me.

    Thanks
     
  7. danielhaden

    danielhaden Network Guru Member

    Have the 2wire router connect your network as previous.

    Log into the WRT54G via your wireless computer and set its ip address into the same range as the primary router.
    If the primary router is 192.168.1.1, then make the WRT54G 192.168.1.250.
    If the primary router is 192.168.23.1, then make the WRT54G 192.168.23.250.

    Remove the ethernet cable from the WAN port of the WRT54G. Do not use the WAN port on the WRT54G. Put that cable into one of the switch (computer) ports. In other words, put the cable into the switch (computer) ports on both routers.

    Log into the WRT54G (again) via your wireless computer and disable the DHCP service. Save that setting, and then restart the wireless computer.

    The DHCP service (gives computers an IP address) will now come from the 2wire router and all of your computers will be on the exact same network.

    Problem: There should only be one DHCP service per network.
    Resolution: Disable the extra DHCP service.

    Problem: There should not be a router at the centerpoint of a single network.
    Resolution: Do not use the WAN port on the wireless router--now it becomes a wired/wireless switch (hub).
     
  8. OldeBill

    OldeBill Network Guru Member

    To AndrewB

    AndrewB,

    What would be the impact of an outsider gaining access to your corporate LAN?

    This is why many IT managers frown upon the appearance of 'rogue' access points on their corporate networks. Open networks are definitely a no-no, WEP is certainly well known as insecure and WPA-PSK TKIP is certainly crackable, especially if it isn't very carefully set up. AES and/or RADIUS would certainly my choice, trouble is that it can be a pain setting up clients to work in this environment.

    As such, I recommend careful consideration and just as careful implementation.
     
  9. 4Access

    4Access Network Guru Member

    Not trying to be argumentative but can you point me to any docs backing this up that don't boil down to a brute force attack on the WPA key which WPA-PSK AES is just as susceptible to?
     
  10. OldeBill

    OldeBill Network Guru Member

    Seems like a fair question to me. I first ran into the allegation myself on the HyperWRT site, here's a link to a more detailed article this posting references http://wifinetnews.com/archives/001034.html. From there you can get to http://wifinetnews.com/archives/002452.html. To be fair, the vulnerability seems to be directly related to the use of "weak" keys and their susceptability to a dictionary attack i.e., brute force. However, how many of us really use truly random keys when we have a whole bunch of clients to set up?

    I'm still mulling over the use of TinyPEAP or a PC based RADIUS server myself.

    Cheers,
    OldeBill
     
  11. 4Access

    4Access Network Guru Member

    I assume you're referring to this thread? While I know the intention of the post was good, IMO I'm afraid it spreads FUD as much as it informs. What the thread doesn't well convey is that WPA-PSK is no more "hacked/cracked" than any other technology relying on passwords. Since the suggestions made in it are good I suppose it does more good than harm though.

    Which WPA-PSK AES is currently just as "vulnerable" to as WPA-PSK TKIP. As are all password protected technologies. . ;)

    Not enough of us. Myself included sometimes. Which is why Linksys created Secure Easy Setup... (Something I'm surprised hasn't been mentioned in the HyperWRT forum thread mentioned above.)

    When WPA-Enterprise is possible it's always better than WPA-PSK, no arguments there. Just wish it was easier to implement. :)
     

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