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two routers on one connection

Discussion in 'Tomato Firmware' started by tjfriese, Mar 25, 2014.

  1. tjfriese

    tjfriese Addicted to LI Member

    A local store is selling the Linksys E900 for cheap today. How easy would the following be to setup:

    Cable modem connects to E900. E900 connects to my VOIP ATA and an ASUS RT-N66U. The ASUS would handle all other connections (wired and wireless) and I would enable QoS (no rules, but bandwidth limited).

    Does the above sound feasible? Would it be a relatively easy way to force my connection to give priority to VOIP (while guaranteeing VOIP with hopefully enough bandwidth to guarantee smooth call quality)?


    Last edited: Mar 25, 2014
  2. darkknight93

    darkknight93 Networkin' Nut Member

    2 ideas:

    Do your ISP provide you 2 public WAN Addresses? So you could have seperate Networks


    You could use the Asus as Primary and E900 as secondary router (portforwarding for VOIP or DMZ) This would enable QoS Feature and provisioning/optimizing VOIP traffic due rules on Asus Primary router
  3. tjfriese

    tjfriese Addicted to LI Member

    I don't believe I have access to a secondary WAN IP address (and if I do, I've read that it's not guaranteed as part of what I'm paying for, so I may not always have access).

    I am looking for a way to separate the VOIP ATA from the rest of the network while guaranteeing enough bandwidth to the ATA such that I always receive good call quality over VOIP.

    I was thinking of using the E900 simply to seaparate the ATA and then use the ASUS (since it's more powerful) to handle a (restricted or limited) subset of my actual bandwidth plus all wireless activities.

    This is just an idea that I'm having as all my attempts to use QoS on the ASUS are not giving me goof VOIP quality while streaming video. Whenever I am on a call while someone else is streaming video then the VOIP outbound audio quality decreases drastically. I believe that this is because the streaming is saturating the pipe but am not 100% sure of this.

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