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unable to resolve target system name

Discussion in 'Networking Issues' started by elam3adi, Sep 26, 2006.

  1. elam3adi

    elam3adi LI Guru Member

    Hello guys, i need your help please
    i have a win2003 server and 6 xp pro workstations
    server ip is 192.168.1.10, 255.255.255.0, 192.168.1.1, dns 192.168.1.10, and my isp dns 205.171.x.x
    workstation start 192.168.1.21--26, 255.255.255.0,192.168.1.1, dns 192.168.1.10, 205.171.x.x
    everything works fine, inertnet works too, except for the company website XXXXX.com it is hosted externaly by some host company
    whenever i type the address in ie it comes back with page cannot be displayed. i try to ping the site it comes back with make sure the name is correct, if i do tracert www.XXXX.com i get unable to resolve target system name.
    i pluged in my laptop without joining the domain, no ips it works with no problem. i'm able to get on the site from anywhere else, excpet internal network. i think the server is blocking the site somehow. firewall is off.
    any ideas?? if you have answer for me give me details cause i'm a new. thanx for all your help.
     
  2. pablito

    pablito Network Guru Member

    I'll wager a guess that the domain specified internally is the same used for the external server. If you have an internal DNS server then add all outside hostnames with the appropriate IPs to the zone.

    Or just change the internal domain name to something different. like yourdomain.int (short for internal). Bogus names are ok inside.
     
  3. elam3adi

    elam3adi LI Guru Member

    Both are diff. my internal domain is gl.com. the address of the site is www.4magnuminsurance.com.
    any ideas?
    thanx in advance.
     
  4. pablito

    pablito Network Guru Member

    It is a DNS issue for sure. It looks like you are using the internal server as everyone's primary DNS, good. That server should then point to itself as the primary DNS so it caches everything. but that isn't the problem.

    Your DNS server somehow thinks that 4magnuminsurance.com is an internal domain and never queries the outside DNS. Check the DNS server and AD. You could run that domain internally if you add the outside IPs to the zone list. Otherwise you need to find the problem in your DNS or AD server and fix/change/delete
     
  5. YeOldeStonecat

    YeOldeStonecat Network Guru Member

    Get your ISPs DNS out of there as the secondary. Your DC should only look at itself in TCP properties for DNS, and your workstations should only look at your DCs IP for their one and only DNS>

    Have you setup your DNS forwarders?

    Take a sping through this quick guide...
    http://www.speedguide.net/read_articles.php?id=1660
     
  6. HennieM

    HennieM Network Guru Member

    I forget what Microsoft calls these entities, but you should have something like this (as already partly indicated by pablito and YeOldeStonecat):

    1) You internal DNS server should be set up to be a "primary" or "master" server for zone gl.com (and also the corresponding reverse IP zone if set up [I think MS mentions something about "PTR records" for reverse IP stuff]).
    2) Your internal DNS server should also list your ISP's DNS server as a "forwarder". (I think this might be the part you are missing).
    3) Your internal DNS server should "cache".

    4) Your DHCP should give out only your internal DNS server to clients.

    The nett effect is that clients will go ONLY to internal-DNS for answers. Internal-DNS would answer if it's a query for the gl.com domain. If not, internal-DNS will ask ISP-DNS to resolve. ISP-DNS will then supply answer to internal-DNS, which will in turn supply answer to client.

    This setup is both bandwidth- and speed-efficient, as internal-DNS will ask ISP-DNS a question only once. If any other clients ask for the same name to be resolved, internal-DNS will supply the answer from its cache.

    [Edit] Forgot to mention. I don't think XP goes to the 2nd or 3rd DNS server supplied to it via DHCP anyway. It asks the 1st DNS to resolve, and if the 1st DNS says "I don't know", XP says "can't resolve".
     

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