1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Wireless-N Access Point with Tomato

Discussion in 'Tomato Firmware' started by occamsrazor, Jul 19, 2009.

  1. occamsrazor

    occamsrazor Network Guru Member

    Seeing as there doesn't seem to be chance for Tomato running on a Wireless-N router... I was wondering whether anyone out there was using a Wireless-N access point in conjunction with a Tomato router?
    Would be interested to know which model and your experiences. Especially interested in anyone using Apple's Time Capsule or Airport Extreme... Cheers.
  2. thor2002ro

    thor2002ro Addicted to LI Member

    all N routers work in g mode... the bastards arent releasing drivers for the boards.... not our fault....
  3. occamsrazor

    occamsrazor Network Guru Member

    Yes, I realise it's not anyone here's fault. But figured that as I already have 3 boxes - Router, gigabit switch, and adsl modem - the "One box does all" idea already died a long time ago and it wouldn't kill me to add another box. I just got a MacBook Pro with N-wireless, so was hoping to take advantage of it.
  4. s0dhi

    s0dhi LI Guru Member

    I'm using a WRT54GL with the WiFi turned off (antennas pulled) as my router and a WRT400N as an access point. THe WRT400N goes A,B,G,N but I've set it for only G & N on 2.4GHz and only N on 5GHz. The WRT400N had the DHCP and other router functions turned off.

    I find the setup to work really well - no issues at all.
  5. occamsrazor

    occamsrazor Network Guru Member

    Thanks s0dhi... so just to check, is the WRT400N doing any routing, DHCP handling, wireless password or wireless mac filtering? Or is all that done by the Tomato router?
  6. bripab007

    bripab007 Network Guru Member

    Yes, there's plenty of folks runnng 802.11n APs along with a Tomato router. I'm running Tomato with wi-fi off and a D-Link DIR-655 router in simple gigabit switch mode my N access point. You just turn off all DHCP, DNS, and routing functionality on the D-Link so that all that stuff can be handled by your Tomato router.
  7. occamsrazor

    occamsrazor Network Guru Member

    @bripab007 - maybe this is a dumb question, but does Tomato still handle wireless mac filtering and wireless password? Does the WAP handle any authentication or other stuff? Sorry I've only ever used routers, never WAPs.
  8. i1135t

    i1135t Network Guru Member

    I am also using the WRT310N router as an AP, running DDWRT because it's not supported by tomato at the moment. It all depends on how you configure that router. Just hard-wire it into your main router, after configuring it as an AP, with DHCP, DNS, and other gateway resources turned off. What you want to achieve is to just pass the information to tomato to do all the routing.
  9. i1135t

    i1135t Network Guru Member

    You should disable the wireless on tomato if you plan on putting the AP right next to it. The interference from each wireless signal will drown each other out, being that close to each other. Yes, even if they are on different channels. The wireless filter will then no longer apply, unless you set them on the AP.
  10. s0dhi

    s0dhi LI Guru Member

    I can try it out, but currently I don't do any WiFi MAC filtering. I would assume that since the Tomato is not running WiFi, filtering on it wouldn't actually filter anything - again this is just speculation.
  11. occamsrazor

    occamsrazor Network Guru Member

    So the WAP would handle wireless password and/or wireless mac filtering, while the tomato router would continue to handle DHCP and addressing. This way the tomato router could still port-forward and do QoS to different wireless devices..... yes?

    Re: the interference, couldn't you set the N router to only use 5Ghz and the Tomato router to only use 2.4Ghz... or is that not how it works in practice. I have other G devices, and was under the impression that if you have G and N devices connected to an N network, it slows down the real-world N speeds.
  12. s0dhi

    s0dhi LI Guru Member

  13. i1135t

    i1135t Network Guru Member

    Yes if they operate on different bands, 2.4 and 5ghz, then I don't see a problem having them side by side. Yes you will lose speed and throughput being that G can only reach max of 54 mbit/sec.. however I don't think if a wireless card that operates on the 2.4 ghz frequency can communicate on a wireless AP running on 5 ghz only...

    And yes, s0dhi is right, by disabling the wireless portion on tomato, all wireless functionality controlled by tomato is disabled. The QoS & port forwards are handled by tomato regardless of wired or wireless clients.
  14. Dashiell

    Dashiell Network Guru Member

    I run wireless G on tomato, and have 2 dlink dap-1522's running wireless N.

    One of the 1522s is the AP, sitting on a shelf underneath the tomato router. Wired into gigabit switch which the tomato router is also connected to.
    The other dap-1522 is a bridge for ethernet devices downstairs.

    Tomato router is set for "G-Only"
    Daps set for N only.
    Both using 2.4Ghz, seperate ssid for each.
    The 5Ghz band on the daps didn't seem to have the range I needed.

    No interference, no issues to report. I have N laptops that get 95-100% signal strength, and the dap bridge gets 88-92%.

    The G laptops using the tomato router get excellent signal strength as well.
  15. Toastman

    Toastman Super Moderator Staff Member Member

    Don't forget that often you don't really need wireless MAC filtering (it only works for a specific AP). Use general MAC "access restriction" rules instead. They will work for any client.
  16. occamsrazor

    occamsrazor Network Guru Member

    Interesting.... are you saying to add the rules to the general access restriction page of Tomato instead of using them via the wireless mac filtering page? Is there any difference in doing it this way? Presumably that page also affects wired connections too.....

Share This Page