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WRT54G performance when cable network is down.

Discussion in 'Networking Issues' started by cwsulliv, Mar 19, 2005.

  1. cwsulliv

    cwsulliv Guest

    I have two wired desktop PCs running under Linux, one wired LAN print server, and one wireless laptop all networked via a Linksys WRT54G router. The wired PCs and print server are configured with static IPs.

    Everything seems to work OK so long as the RoadRunner cable network is functioning normally. I can send intra-domain mail back and forth using mail/sendmail, print to the printer, and transfer files back and forth using scp without problems.

    However if the RR cable network is down (which has been happening with some regularity recently), the LAN network goes to hell. It takes a minute or more to establish a ssh connection or for intra-domain mail to be delivered. (I can simulate this by disconnecting the RR cable from the cable modem.)

    It appears that the router always wants to first check the ISP's DNS server, and not until after a ~1 min timeout does it then establish the direct PC-PC connection.

    There does not seem to be any router setting similar to the ordering (hosts, bind) which appears in /etc/host.conf

    My question: Am I doing something obviously wrong, or am I using the wrong router, or do all routers behave this way?
  2. AbNormal

    AbNormal Network Guru Member

    Your mail clients are most likely configured to refer your local email server by name, which requires a DNS lookup. Since the router only has an external DNS to point to, then it will hang, as the lookup attempt fails.

    You could:

    Download a copy of Sveasoft software, which would allow you to define pre-determined (fixed) DHCP addresses for your clients. Instead of configuring the clients with static IPs, just use DHCP and they will always receive the same "known" address. Second, with DNS Masq, and Local DNS selected, you could then refer to the email server by name.

    Or, just substitute the fixed IP address for your local email server in your client's mail configuration, instead of referring to it by name.

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