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WRT54GS-Qos for Ethernet

Discussion in 'Networking Issues' started by SAPo57, Jan 15, 2006.

  1. SAPo57

    SAPo57 Network Guru Member

    I'm setting up a higher bandwith for my two PS2's for better online gaming. I have the two devices set with their MAC's and one with a "High" priority and another with a "Highest" priority. My upstream bandwith is set to "AUTO" since I get upstream errors when it's set to "MANUAL" with any speed 0-.... and I've checked "Optimize Gaming Applications". Now, I've been told that it would help to setup an FTP application to "high" priority on the APPLICATION tab. This did help which did not cause anymore errors or disconnections. Also, since my router is connected to an ethernet network and my GATEWAY is a PPPoE connection, my MTU has to be set to 1500 otherwise I'd put it at 1492 or less. EVERYTHING IS SET, BUT MY CONNECTION FOR MY PS2(s) IS A BIT LAGGY. This can only be corrected using my RT41-BU Broadband Router by setting up a static IP/MAC internet access policy, but I need to use my wireless router because the other router has all of it's ports connected to a device (the router is located at a far end of my house and I cannot connect my PS2 devices that far). Can anyone assist me with fixing this issue on my wireless router?
     
  2. vincentfox

    vincentfox Network Guru Member

    TAKE A BREATH!

    Phew I get tired just reading that torrent of information.

    I 'm not clear on how things are hooked up.

    Are the PS2 units hardwired to the WRT54GS? What is this RT41-BU unit?

    As information, anytime you add WiFi hops, you add latency. You want least possible lag for gaming, you run a wire.
     
  3. SAPo57

    SAPo57 Network Guru Member

    PS2=PlayStation 2, you ever heard that. Like the Xbox, but manufactured by SONY. Hardwired? they just connect through an Ethernet UTP connection. And WIFI? Didn't you read or at least see the topic "ETHERNET" which in most cases would mean "WIRED".
     
  4. Mercenary

    Mercenary Network Guru Member

    SAP, I suggest you STFU. Everyone knows PS2 is a Playstation 2. He was simply asking how things are hooked up.

    Your here asking for help, I suggest you be a little more polite to those trying to get a little more info.
     
  5. NateHoy

    NateHoy Network Guru Member

    When you set the upstream to Manual, what are you putting in the upstream field?

    Normally, you want to test your upstream using a tool like www.dslreport.com/stest, with QoS on your router turned off and nothing going on in your Internet connection, then enter about 95% of that number and start tuning from there.

    Here is an article I started for another forum, you may find it useful.

    http://vonage.nmhoy.net/qos.html

    EDIT: Rereading your post, I now understand why vincentfox was asking all those questions.

    Could you post a quick diagram of your network? In the form of:

    MODEM connected to (router1)
    (router1) connected to PC's
    (router1) connected to (router2)
    (router2) connected to PS2's.

    Just to give us an idea of which device is feeding which.

    QoS really only works well on one router on your network - the router that is connected to your Internet modem. You can "clamp down" any client routers by setting their upstream bandwidth to some manual value, which will lower the demands placed by that router, and prioritize the data coming from that router, but then the data is put through QoS again and "mixed" with your traffic from the primary router. This "dual QoS" layer will probably cause some lag.
     
  6. SAPo57

    SAPo57 Network Guru Member

    thanks for the info. NATEHOY unlike sum fuc'k as's bitc'hes like mercenary who doesn't even know who hes talkin about, damn herb .
     
  7. SAPo57

    SAPo57 Network Guru Member

    NATEHOY-MY NETWORK DIAGRAM

    1st my DSL Modem,with built-in router, is the main gateway (one ethernet port).

    2ND A 5-port swithch is hooked up to the modem.


    3RD one PC CONNECTS through the switch only to have full control over the modem's interface and bandwidth.

    4TH a broadband router (5-ports) connects to the switch to support two PC's


    5th the wireless router (5-ports)with the QOS connects to broadband router, the wireless routers supports two notebooks (wireless connection) and one ps2 (ethernet only).
     
  8. NateHoy

    NateHoy Network Guru Member

    Let me see if I understand your network correctly before I get to diagnosis. I'm having trouble visualizing it. I thought *I* had a complex network...

    [​IMG]

    Is that a correct display of your network?

    I've put letters on each device so we can be clear on what we are talking about.[/url]
     
  9. SAPo57

    SAPo57 Network Guru Member

    NATEHOY-NETWORK DIAGRAM

    YES, THAT'S THE CORRECT DIAGRAM.
     
  10. SAPo57

    SAPo57 Network Guru Member

    ONE MORE THING

    THE SWITCH HAS THE HIGHEST BANDWIDTH-

    (SINCE IT'S THE 1ST DEVICE TO THE MODEM AND REGENRATES,RETIMES, FORWARDS SPECIFIC DATA,ETC.)

    Now any host or device that connects to it receives optimal performance (internet), but for the ps2 it cannot because many CRC or data errors occur when connecting to an online game server (only through the ps2).

    So what I've done is connect it to the broadband router which has less options to simple open FTP and other beneficial ports to the ps2.

    (I've manually configured the ps2 to have a static IP as well so that the apps. can work better to communicate directly back-to-back with the router and game server rather than the DHCP server interfering while im connected=connection can drop if IP addresss cannot be renewed for a certain period)

    Well the broadband router seems to work better than the wireless router that has the Qos+Gaming Apps. enabled.
     
  11. NateHoy

    NateHoy Network Guru Member

    OK, a few things.

    Your PS2 performance is going to suck. It is going through four network devices (G->D->B->A->Internet). Three of them are routers.

    QoS on router (G) is meaningless. It is only shaping traffic for the "hop" above it, and it is shaping that traffic for local network speeds, not Internet speeds.

    IMHO, your network is far too complex for what you are trying to do. I'd eliminate at least one of the routers, but preferably you want to have only one router on your network. I'm going to assume that the router in your DSL modem does not have QoS capability, so we'll ignore that router.

    What you want to do is hook the router with QoS (G) directly to your DSL router. Eliminate the switch (B), the other router (D), and wire all of your computers right to (G). If any of your routers is a WRT54G/GS, you are better off loading aftermarket firmware, but at LEAST make sure it is running the very latest firmware for whatever it is.

    If you need more network connections, or need some of them in a remote area of the house, hook the switch (B) up to the router (G) and use that.

    Next, take (G) and turn off all QoS functionality temporarily. Hook up only one PC to it and do a speed test on www.dslreports.com/stest and enter about 95% of the tested UPSTREAM speed into the QoS Upstream Data Rate (Upstream Speed, whatever) field in (G). Then enter the MAC address for your PS2 in QoS and set it to HIGHEST, and enable QoS.


    Now you can hook up your network, and at the end it should look something like this:

    [​IMG]

    QoS can only affect performance on devices hooked directly downstream of the router, and it can only control the data flowing out of it directly. It cannot affect upstream performance. So your current QoS setup will only help the PS2 compete for network resources against the laptops, it's useless anyway since it is shaping traffic for your next upstream router (D), and that router runs at local network speeds.

    Put your QoS router at the top of the food chain, configure it properly, and run all your devices on it, and it'll stand a chance of being able to control your network for you.
     
  12. SAPo57

    SAPo57 Network Guru Member

    ONE MAIN ISSUE THAT CAN'T BE RESOLVED

    THE THING IS I'VE ALREADY TRY THAT. WHY DON'T I USE IT? Well the wireless router cant make a direct connection with the modem only if I "Bridge" the Ethernet on my modem.

    PROBELEM: although this will work, bridging has caused many data errors and slow network performance (it extremely clogs my bandwidth)

    Bigger Problem: the wireless router can't use its WAN ports at same time to connect to the modem's IP address so that I can access my modem's online user interface to reboot or reset the modem to unclog all of that bad data on the line (recently had connection dropped for hours and can't get back connection unless I reset it to factory settings,ONLY POSSIBLE WAY TO GET MY INTERNET BACK UP)

    Biggest issue: to reset the modem I have to disconnect the cable that connects to my router and connect it to my PC, BUT WAIT! If my Ethernet is Bridged I can't access the "ONLINE" interface it won't work through my pc. LOL and something else for some reason "IF" the wireless "G" router w/speedbooster powers off or internet cable gets disconnected it cant connect to the modem NO POSSIBLE WAY or the internet as if it got reseted to factory settings.

    STRANGE STUFF-ANNOYING NETWORK PROBLEMS-&TECHNICAL ISSUES LINKSYS HAS TO FIX ON THEIR DEVICES 4 REAL!


    ITS EITHER THE NETWORK I HAVE NOW OR USING MY BROADBAND ROUTER, WHICH WORKS FINE WITH THE MODEM ALONE (BUT CANT CONNECT MY NOTEBOOKS WIRELESSLY TO THE INTERNET).
     

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