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WRTSL54GS USB Disk Setup and Folder/File Shares

Discussion in 'Cisco/Linksys Wireless Routers' started by Bill_S, Jun 1, 2006.

  1. Bill_S

    Bill_S Network Guru Member

    Any help on how to achieve the following would really be appreciated.

    All I want to do is give each user a private folder (only allowing that user to read and write to that folder) on the drive attached to the router and one public space for all users to read and write to. With the exception of the administrator, I don’t want any of the other users to be able to access another’s folder.

    So, I attached a USB drive (Adaptec housing with a Western Digital drive) to the router and formatted in FAT32 with one partition, using the routers software. I then setup 4 separate shares, one for each of our three users and one public.

    I then setup four groups, one for each of the users and one for all users.

    I gave each group access to each of its corresponding shares. I enabled all partitions to be shared in the storage tab but, when I place something in one of the folders it shows up in all of the folders and can be written to and read.

    All the setup was done using the routers web based programs and menus. I have the latest firmware (2.00.5) and all the computers and router are on the same workgroup and wireless network.

    Can you tell me what I am doing wrong? I have contacted Linksys Tech. support but they don’t seem to know anything about this product. I know I can use a third party firmware but I would rather stick with the Linksys if possible.

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. plugh

    plugh Network Guru Member

    In between your first and second sentence should be -

    "I then created four folders - folder1, folder2, folder3, folder4"

    THEN 'setup 4 seperate shares, one for each FOLDER'

    ie on the "Share" page, hit 'Create New Share' button,
    then hit 'Select Partition' button,
    then on the popup window, click on the partition name,
    then on the folder listing, click Select button for folder#
    then back on the Share page, give it a name eg share#

    Now you have four shares mapped to four folders.

    Take it from there.

    FYI, there are significant issues with the fat32 support in the sl54 (in particular with drives over 250gb) which can lead to data loss and / or file system corruption. If you wish to stay with the stock firmware I wouldn't use a disk over 120gb, and would avoid copying large files to the drive. You've been warned.
     
  3. Bill_S

    Bill_S Network Guru Member

    Plugh, thank you, that did it and I understand your warning.

    Thanks again.
     
  4. michael1231

    michael1231 LI Guru Member

    Hi plugh, you mentioned that the large file will have some problem. What size of the file will cause it? Does it happen all the time?


    ===============================
    FYI, there are significant issues with the fat32 support in the sl54 (in particular with drives over 250gb) which can lead to data loss and / or file system corruption. If you wish to stay with the stock firmware I wouldn't use a disk over 120gb, and would avoid copying large files to the drive. You've been warned.[/quote]
     
  5. plugh

    plugh Network Guru Member

  6. michael1231

    michael1231 LI Guru Member

    I have seen your post in HyperWRT forum. Your already got the point that SMB will try to allocate all file size in HDD in the beginnig of transferring, so it will casue the sl54gs busy on I/O and sometimes makes it timeout of responding. You will find it is ok of large file while using FTP, because FTP will grow the file length by each packet write instead.
    I have made a patch for this issue last week, but I doesn't have much test on it. I will give you the patch when I am at office tomorrow, and you can try and see if it would work.

    =============================================
     
  7. Thibor

    Thibor Super Moderator Staff Member Member

    Michael, if you send the patch to me, i will incorporate it into the codebase for my firmware.
     
  8. michael1231

    michael1231 LI Guru Member

    Thibor, I have sent the patch to you. The samba part fixed the large file issue, and the kernel part made the fat32 support maximum file size to 4GB(old is 2GB).


    ===========================================
     
  9. Bill_S

    Bill_S Network Guru Member

    Although it is not stated on the box or in any of the accompanying literature the WRTSL54GS cannot transfer more than 1 gig of data at a time to an attached USB drive. Anything over that will cause the device to crash.

    This information was given to me by a Linksys Senior Tech. #22123 and she further stated that they have no plans to correct this.

    Just an FYI for any of you planning on purchasing the WRTSL54GS in the near future.
     
  10. Thibor

    Thibor Super Moderator Staff Member Member

    michael, thanks; i have it. Bill, it will crash transferring less than a gig of data to a fat32 drive, Thibor15c will remedy this hopefully, thanks to Michaels patch.
     
  11. Bill_S

    Bill_S Network Guru Member

    Would you guys recommend that I install another firmware on the WRTSL54GS? If so which one and is there a special method of installation.

    Thanks,

    Bill
     
  12. plugh

    plugh Network Guru Member

    two workarounds

    Been doing some research and testing...

    The central issue to the 'large file write' problem is the way various things interact when a large file is created on the fat32 usb disk. I'm still digging into this, but thought I'd post two workarounds.

    #1) Use the built-in FTP server rather than SMB to transfer large files to the system. The reason this works is because the ftp server does not preallocate the disk space to receive the file, but grows the file as data is received.

    #2) referencing this microsoft knowledge base article, set sesstimeout to a sufficiently large value. Based upon limited testing, it took approx 4.5 minutes to prep a 1.75GB file, so a setting of 300 seconds is probably sufficient up to 2GB. (Of course, this has implications for ALL server connections).

    What is it doing, why is it doing it, and can anything be done about it? I am pursueing these questions along several avenues, and hope to have a firmware solution at some point...
     
  13. grcore

    grcore Network Guru Member

    I do know that transferring a large file from a linux box using smb4k transfers just fine without any delay.....
     
  14. plugh

    plugh Network Guru Member

    Please confirm -

    You transfered a GB+ sized file from a linux box using the smb4k utility, to a fat32 formatted usb hdd attached to a wrtsl54gs, without experiencing any issues?

    If so, I would guess the smb4k utiliity does not request preallocation of disk space (like ftp) or just has a generous timeout and left you thinking it was transferring during that initial phase.

    -----------------------------------

    Regarding the "what is it doing" question above, some additional experiments reveals that 'something' is literally zeroing out the newly created file. Perhas a 'feature' to prevent disk scavanging..
     
  15. grcore

    grcore Network Guru Member

    yes, no problemo. have transferred 1gb size files and larger, no problemo with linux/smb4k

    g
     
  16. plugh

    plugh Network Guru Member

    From previous posts, I thought you were using ext2 on your sl54 attached usb hdd.

    I'll test this on my end and see if I can figure out what smb4k does differant.

    -------------------------------------------

    Researching this is proving very interesting... There has been quite a bit of historical debate about how to properly extend a file (on fat fs), what code should be responsible for handling it (application, glibc, fs driver), and related 'sparse file' issues. The samba code used in the sl54 appears to have three ways of handling this.

    1) call sys_ftruncate to extend the file
    2) lseek to new end and write one byte (then lseek back)
    3) loop and write zeros to file from current end to new end

    Using truncate to extend a file appears to be the most controversial (with various patches having been proposed / added / pulled to support this in the fat file system driver).

    I'm still studying the second case, but I suspect it zero fills between the current and new end-of-file in the fs driver.

    The third case is controlled by the samba "strict allocate" config option (default is 'no'). The comments in the samba code in this area are interesting...
     

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